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  • Psychic Missing Person Search - Missing photo 5 - Sept 2021 A detective is an investigator, usually a member of a law enforcement agency. They often collect information to solve crimes by talking to witnesses and informants, collecting physical evidence, or searching records in databases. This leads them to arrest criminals and enable them to be convicted in court. A detective may work for the police or privately.





Missing

Brittney Ann Beers










Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them



Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them



Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them



Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them



Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them



Missing Person Case by Psychic Detective Brian Ladd - September 2021 we will find them


Brittney, approximately 1997; Age at the time of disappearance: -progression at Age at the time of disappearance: 25 (approximately 2016); Composite sketch of person seen speaking to Brittney; Daniel Furlong in 2015




Date and time person was reported missing : 09/16/1997

Missing location (approx) :
Sturgis, Michigan
Missing classification : Endangered Missing
Gender : Female
Ethnicity :
White


DOB : 08/01/1991 (30)
Age at the time of disappearance: 6 years old
Height / Weight : 4'0, 45 pounds
Description, clothing, jewerly and more : A white tank top or t-shirt with a floral design, pink tie-dyed shorts and white sneakers with a pink design on the sides. Her shoelaces had a red stripe down the center.
Distinguishing characteristics, birthmarks, tattoos : Caucasian female. Blonde hair, blue eyes. Brittney was missing her four upper baby teeth at the time of her 1997 disappearance. She often wore her hair pulled back into a ponytail.





Information on the case from local sources, may or may not be correct : Brittney was playing outside of her family's residence at VillAge at the time of disappearance: Manor Apartments during the evening hours of September 16, 1997. She went outside to ride her bicycle at approximately 7:30 p.m. Brittney's mother, Tina Stetler, left to run errands at approximately 8:30 p.m. and saw her daughter riding her bicycle around the neighborhood at that time.
Brittney's half-brother told authorities he saw his sister sitting on a bench about five minutes after their mother departed. A witness told investigators that he saw Brittney speaking to an unidentified male driving a red or brown mid-size vehicle shortly thereafter. Brittney walked over to the witness and told him that she "made a new friend." Brittney has never been seen again.
Stetler returned home at approximately 9:05 p.m. and asked Brittney's brother to find her. The authorities were summoned when the child could not be located near the apartment complex, which is located on U.S. 12, the major thoroughfare through Sturgis. Brittney's bicycle was discovered abandoned shortly after she was last seen.
Sketches of the unidentified man seen speaking to Brittney were distributed through the area in the days following her disappearance. One of the sketches is posted with this case summary. It is not known if the man is connected to her case. He was in his late twenties or early thirties with short dark hair and a thick mustache and was driving either a mid-sized red car or a brown Renault. Police are still looking for the man; he is not being called a suspect, but a witness whom they would like to question.
Michigan courts removed Brittney's older brother and younger sister from the family's home in 1998 after allegations of child physical and Gender : ual abuse and neglect were issued. Brittney's father, Raymond Beers; his brother, James Beers; and Kevin Folsom, the father of one of her half-brothers, were allegedly involved in the abuse of the children. Folsom was imprisoned for molesting Brittney, but he was released in 2008.
Brittney's case received more publicity in 2000 after the arrest of a St. Clair Shores, Michigan man who had imAge at the time of disappearance: s of child Gender : ual abuse saved on his computer. One of the victims resembled Brittney, but was later determined not to be the missing girl.
In 2015, police named Daniel Furlong as a person of interest in Brittney's abduction. He abducted, Gender : ually assaulted and strangled an eleven-year-old girl, Jodi Parrack, in 2007. The murder was not solved until 2015, after Furlong abducted a ten-year-old girl who subsequently escaped from him. After he became a suspect in the child's abduction, he provided a DNA sample which linked him to Jodi's murder. He subsequently confessed to the murder, pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison. He stated he'd picked Jodi at random and that he'd intended to kill the ten-year-old he kidnapped.
Furlong bears a striking resemblance to the sketch of the man seen with Brittney prior to her disappearance, his known crimes were similar to Brittney's disappearance, and Jodi closely resembled her. He has maintained his innocence in her case, but remains one of the few persons of interest. A photo of Furlong is posted with this case summary.
Brittney's case remains open and unsolved.


Other information and links : ncy

Sturgis Police Department
269-651-3231



September 2021 updates and sources

Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (Missing Children’s Statistics One Missing Child Is One Too Many The lack of a common definition of “missing child,” and a common response to the issue, results in few reliable statistics on the scope of the problem around the world. Even with this challenge, we know that: In Australia, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Australian Federal Police, National Coordination Centre. In Canada, an estimated 45,288 children are reported missing each year. Government of Canada, Canada’s Missing – 2015 Fast Fact Sheet. In Germany, an estimated 100,000 children are reported missing each year. Initiative Vermisste Kinder. In India, an estimated 96,000 children go missing each year. Bachpan Bachao Andolan, Missing Children of India. In Jamaica, an estimated 1,984 children were reporting missing in 2015. Jamaica’s Office of Children’s Registry In Russia, an estimated 45,000 children were reported missing in 2015. Interview with Pavel Astakhov MIA “Russia Today”, Apr. 4, 2016. In Spain, an estimated 20,000 children are reported missing every year. Spain Joins EU Hotline for Missing Children, Sep. 22, 2010. In the United Kingdom, an estimated 112,853 children are reported missing every year. National Crime Agency, UK Missing Persons Bureau. In the United States, an estimated 460,000 children are reported missing every year. Federal Bureau of Investigation, NCIC. This, however, is only a snapshot of the problem. In many countries, statistics on missing children are not even available; and, unfortunately, even available statistics may be inaccurate due to: under-reporting/under-recognition; inflation; incorrect database entry of case information; and deletion of records once a case is closed. The lack of numbers, and the discrepancy in the numbers that do exist, is one of the key reasons why ICMEC developed and advocates for the Model Missing Child Framework, which assists countries with building strong, well-rounded national responses, and facilitates more efficient investigations, management, and resolution of missing children cases. We firmly believe that one missing child is one too many, and we are committed to improving the global understanding of and response to missing and abducted children. Here is a look at missing children in the United States. There are several different types of missing children: runaways, family abductions, lost or “thrown away” and non-family abductions. Advances in technology, communications through public alerts and greater cooperation from law enforcement have facilitated the recovery process. Statistics According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.) Missing Person File, there are 89,637 active missing person records, of which juveniles under the age of 18 account for 30,396 (34%) of the records. (as of December 31, 2020) AMBER Alert “AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alerts are emergency messages broadcast when a law enforcement agency determines that a child has been abducted and is in imminent danger. The broadcasts include information about the child and the abductor, including physical descriptions as well as information about the abductor’s vehicle - which could lead to the child’s recovery.” The AMBER Alert system began in 1996 and was named in honor of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted in Arlington, Texas, and murdered. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands have AMBER Alert plans in place to help find missing children in danger. As of December 2020, the AMBER Alert program has been credited with the safe recovery of 1029 children.
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